FOCUS like a lion

FOCUS like a lion

FOCUS like a lion

 

Ashley and I just got back from a mastermind meeting in Dallas, Texas. It was made up of real estate investors from all over the U.S. who are seeking to build better businesses by developing their systems and processes. Ya’ll, it was phenomenal!

 

 

Each investor gaves a 15-minute presentation where they told a little about themselves and their company. Next, they told the group about some challenges they were facing, followed by a review of their 90-day goals, known as rocks. These rocks were set at the last meeting.

 

These aspects are important because the purpose of the group is to spend the next 15 minutes helping the presenter overcome those challenges and improve. The group also seeks to hold the presenter accountable by asking the question, “Did you complete your rocks?” And if the answer is “no,” the next question is, “Why not?” The answer will uncover new challenges ranging from lack of knowledge to lack of focus to lack of effort.

 

This process inspired and challenged us to be better, all while holding us accountable.

 

We learn a ton while we were presenting. But I found that we learned even more as we listened and interacted with the group as the members helped the others overcome their challenges.

 

The last part of the presentation is called the “give.” Everyone had to think of some process, technology or tool that they thought would help the group succeed.

 

 

Sharad, one of the presenters who Ashley and I now know as a good friend, had a two-part give. The first part was simply a story about a lion tamer. It was powerful, and I’d like to share it with you.

 

The master lion tamer in a famous circus was about to retire and decided it was time to start training a successor. After interviewing many candidates, a young student was chosen, and the training began.

 

To begin, the master told the student, “Most courageous lion tamers use two tools to control and ‘tame’ the fierce companions prowling around the cage: a whip and a chair. Which of the two is the most important to the tamer?”

 

The student replied, “Surely the whip.”

 

The master said, “No. The tamer’s most important tool is the chair. And more specifically, its four legs!”

 

When the student asked why, the master replied, “When a lion, like all cats, prepares to attack, it settles into a pouncing posture and gets hyper focused on a singular object — its prey. Knowing this, a lion tamer uses the chair as a method of distraction. When the lion is faced with the legs of the chair, it tries to concentrate on all four at once. Confused and unable to focus, the mighty beast stands there, frozen! Thus the lion tamer uses the chair to move the animal wherever he wishes.”

 

What Sharad pointed out from this story was that when investors go to seminars and masterminds, they often get overloaded with all kinds of new knowledge and technology. When they get home, they often look over their notes, get overwhelmed and never implement a single thing they just learned.

 

I know I’ve done that before.

 

Sharad and another presenter suggested that you should instead FOCUS. I capitalized that because it is an acronym. FOCUS stands for Follow One Course Until Successful.

 

When you get back from a training, don’t try to do everything. Instead, do one thing until you get good at it. Then, move to the next and then the next.

 

 

If you try to concentrate on too many things, you’ll likely be unable to focus, and you may find yourself frozen. However, if you can get hyper-focused on one thing at a time, like a lion when he pounces, you’ll be a force to be reckoned with.

 

Joe and Ashley English buy houses and mobile homes in Northwest Georgia. For more information or to ask a question, go to www.cashflowwithjoe.com or call Joe at 678-986-6813.

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